Teeth health: The fruit that may naturally help whiten teeth – may remove stains

Teeth whitening: Dentist discusses at home methods

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The NHS explains brushing your teeth twice a day with fluoride toothpaste and having regular check-ups with a dentist can help to keep your teeth healthy. Nonetheless, there are some foods which can damage your teeth. Indeed, the health body explains: “Diet, smoking and drinking alcohol also have an effect on dental health.”

The Oral Health Foundation said: “It takes up to an hour for your mouth to cancel out the acid caused by eating and drinking sugar.

“During this time your teeth are under attack from this acid. It is therefore important to limit the number of attacks by having sugary foods and drinks just at mealtimes.”

The American Dental Association (ADA) says: “Your mouth, teeth, and gums are more than just tools for eating. They’re essential for chewing and swallowing—the first steps in the digestion process.

“Your mouth is your body’s initial point of contact with the nutrients you consume. So what you put in your mouth impacts not only your general health but also that of your teeth and gums. In fact, if your nutrition is poor, the first signs often show up in your mouth.”

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Long Grove Dental Studio says a fruit that can diminish the appearance of tooth staining is pineapple.

The organisation says: “Pineapple is naturally packed with bromelain — a natural anti-inflammatory and cleansing agent.

“This stuff is good at cleaning that a recent study by the International Journal of Dental Hygiene found that it can safely and effectively remove tooth stains.”

One study aimed to evaluate the colour change in human enamel bleached with three different concentrations of hydrogen peroxide, containing pineapple extract as an additive in two different timings, using reflectance spectrophotometer.

It found the addition of pineapple extract to hydrogen peroxide resulted in effective bleaching.

The ADA says for dental health, it’s recommended that people limit eating and drinking between meals.

The organisation says: “Of course, sometimes eating between meals must happen. Unfortunately, most people choose foods like sweets and chips for snacks; foods that harm teeth by promoting tooth decay.

“If you do snack, make it a nutritious choice—such as cheese, yoghurt, fruits, vegetables or nuts—for your overall health and the health of your teeth.”

The Oral Health Foundation said: “Tooth decay can be painful and lead to fillings, crowns or inlays.

“If tooth decay is not treated, the nerve of the tooth can become infected and die, causing an abscess.”

The organisation says: “When you eat foods containing sugars and starches, the bacteria in plaque produce acids, which attack tooth enamel.

“The stickiness of the plaque keeps these acids in contact with your teeth. After constant acid attack, the tooth enamel breaks down forming a hole or cavity.”

It says that many people think that it is a high level of sugar in your diet that causes decay, “but this is not true”.

The organisation explains it is how often you have sugar in your diet, not the amount, that causes problems.

The ADA says: “Your mouth, teeth, and gums are more than just tools for eating. They’re essential for chewing and swallowing—the first steps in the digestion process.

“Your mouth is your body’s initial point of contact with the nutrients you consume. So what you put in your mouth impacts not only your general health but also that of your teeth and gums. In fact, if your nutrition is poor, the first signs often show up in your mouth.”

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